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Events

Farmland Museum and Denny Abbey Exhibition

The Museum of British Folklore MORRIS FOLK project

In 2013, Simon Costin, the Director of the Museum of British Folklore, had an idea to document the hundreds of morris sides currently active in Britain by replicating their distinctive costumes. He sent out a call to them via www.museumofbritishfolklore.com. Morris Folk is a kind of 3D archive: a detailed copy of morris costumes made by the practitioners themselves.

To make the process easier and to allow the characteristics of the costumes to be highlighted, a plain cloth doll was commissioned. The doll has no features, allowing makers the freedom to embellish it as they see fit. Enabling contributors to have complete artistic expression ensures that the project is truly collaborative, with the resulting dolls being an accurate representation of their respective sides. The completed dolls have been made with amazing attention to detail: from the inclusion of human hair, to miniature buttons and accessories.

To date, the Museum of British Folklore now has over 273 completed dolls and they have been exhibited in London, Oxford, Sussex, Warwickshire and now, in Cambridgeshire.

If you are a morris side who would like to participate in the project, please email the Museum of British Folklore: mofbf@clara.co.uk, so that we can send a doll to you.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We would like to extend our thanks to everyone who is involved with Morris Folk: the morris sides themselves, without whom, the project would not be possible and to the Farmland Museum and Denny Abbey for hosting this exhibition.

For more information and to support the Museum of British Folklore, which aims to be the first museum to celebrate and conserve Britain’s seasonal customs, please visit:

www.museumofbritishfolklore.com

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Morris Folk Exhibition opens in Oxford at OoU

From the 18th June - 8th July, we are showing 24 of our Morris Dolls at Objects of Use in Oxford. Running along one wall and in the window space will be a colourful selection of the figures on show. There will also be a screening of The Way of the Morris with the director, Tim Plester present to answer questions afterwards. Simon and Mellany from the MoBF will also be there, so do please come along and say hello. We look forward to seeing you there.

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Morris Dolls at Compton Verney

There is now an exhibition of 45 of our Morris Dolls situated within the Folk Art galleries at Compton Verney. The exhibition will run until June 25th 2017.

http://www.comptonverney.org.uk

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Aelfgythe Boarder Morris

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Pecsaetan Morris

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Hunters Moon Morris




The Ballad of British Folklore

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Morris Folk at the Weald & Downland Museum

29th April - 12th June 2016
Open Daily 10.30am – 6.00pm

Two years ago the museum began an ongoing project to document the hundreds of Morris sides currently active in Britain by getting the teams to replicate their distinctive costumes in miniature. To make the process easier and to allow the characteristics of the costumes to be highlighted, a plain cloth doll was commissioned. The doll has no features, allowing makers the freedom to embellish it as they see fit. Enabling contributors to have complete artistic expression ensures that the project is truly collaborative, with the resulting dolls being an accurate representation of their respective sides.

The completed dolls have exceeded all expectations - the immense time and care that has been taken to recreate the costumes as faithfully as possible is evident in the finished articles. They have been made with amazing attention to detail: from the inclusion of human hair, to miniature buttons and accessories.

As well as being a more generic document, the dolls sometimes reflect a point in time in a Morris side’s existence. For example, Bakanalia Morris’ captain - or ‘squire’ in Morris parlance - had a broken leg whilst the side’s doll was being created. Consequently, the finished doll is replete with miniature leg splint. This kind of feature is typical of the spirit in which people have contributed to the project.

http://www.wealddown.co.uk/events/visiting-exhibition-morris-folk/

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Talks on MORRIS FOLK and the Museum of British Folklore will be held in the Jerwood Gridshell Space at the Food & Folk Festival on Sunday 1st May at 11.30am and 2.30pm
www.wealddown.co.uk/events/food-and-folk/




Pick Me Up Graphic Arts Festival

The museum has collaborated with the Beach Gallery in London. A selection of their artists have produced a range of artworks inspired by the museums collection. The show runs from 21st April - 2nd May at Somerset House.

http://pickmeup.somersethouse.org.uk/2016/collectives

http://beach.london/

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